Sunday, December 8, 2019
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Aspects to Consider before Speaking with a Mausoleum Maker

After losing a loved one, a number of decisions enter the picture. Many revolve around the funeral and memorial service, but burial sites also come into play. Some choose single burial sites or isolated spots whereas others purchase sizable family plots. Still, a number of people are turning to mausoleums. If you’re considering having a mausoleum built, certain factors should be taken into account beforehand.

Type of Mausoleum

Mausoleums are available in two distinct types: personal and family. While the former is designed to hold a single person, the latter offers a final resting place for multiple family members. Some cemeteries provide public mausoleums in which people are allowed to purchase crypts as well, but these tend to be few and far between.

Construction Material

In many cases, mausoleums are made of concrete. Some are built from marble or granite. Of course, a Mausoleum Maker may use virtually any combination of materials in the design and construction of these structures, such as tiles, precious metals and glass to name a few.

Design

Design depends largely on the requests of the person having the mausoleum built. Some are simple whereas others are large and ornately decorated. They can even be modeled after historic landmarks if desired. From straightforward walk-in vaults to large structures with seating, individual alcoves for each family member and areas for flowers and other memorial items, the possibilities are endless.

Benefits and Downfalls

Privacy and customization could be considered the most significant benefits of having a mausoleum built. On the downside, mausoleums can be quite a bit more expensive than burial plots. Cost depends largely on size, style and the types of materials being used. They also eventually run out of space, so generations to follow will ultimately be left out of the family mausoleum. At the same time, cemeteries often place restrictions on the sizes and styles of mausoleums allowed on their grounds.

For those who prefer something other than a conventional grave site as their final resting place, mausoleums may be the solution. They offer individuals and families private final resting places as well as more personalization options than conventional graves. Numerous types of stone and other materials may be incorporated into their design, and almost any architectural style can be used.